Saturday, May 23, 2020

Video Games A Contemporary Scapegoat - 2374 Words

From character to character, the brutal kills range from ripping out spines to slicing the opponents straight in half to chopping off foes arms. They were all just obeying the thunderous voice rumbling, Finish him! This is Mortal Kombat – one of, if not the, most popular fighting game franchises ever created. At its conception in 1992, it was hit with a hard wall of controversy for its heavy use of gore and the general fear it would influence children to reenact these so-called â€Å"fatalities† in real life. Ever since the 1970s, man was finally able to interact with the screen, creating a universe written in ones and zeros. However, does the screen speak back to us, and cause effects outside of the console? Though video games have widely†¦show more content†¦Even with the common shooter profile of â€Å"young male, suicidal, and depressed,† there are too many false positives. There is, nor will there ever be, a way to certainly predict a shooting. As a society, we just try to endlessly blame other causes, while, in fact, we just need to stand up and take responsibility. The game industry will not outright censor itself over what those with damaged personas would do. Now, violence in games does not just exist for the sake of bloodshed. Violence in games is not any worse than that founds in other forms of media such as movies, music, and television. Ever since the hunter-gatherer days, humanity has been partially hardwired to crave violence. From gladiator fights to public executions, people have always flocked to the scene of the carnage. Admittedly, a normal citizen nowadays would be much more able to access violence at his or her fingertips – turn on the radio, and Jay-Z blasts on the Top 40, rapping about Kurt Cobain’s suicide. Power on the television and the entire wedding congregation is massacred on Game of Thrones. Head to the theaters, and they will be advertising Hunger Games: Catching Fire, a movie markete d the PG-13 audience about twelve teenagers fighting to the death for the entertainment of the country. Why should video games be treated any differently? On September 20th, 2013, Grand Theft Auto 5, the fifth installment of the controversial open-worldShow MoreRelatedViolence and Americas Troubled Youth Essays1069 Words   |  5 PagesVideo games have come a long way since the days of Pong. Advances in technology have allowed games to present state of the art graphics and surreal like qualities to its consumers; from four star simulated battle scenes to enhanced real live fire shoot outs. With all these innovations added to violent video games it attracted the visual needs of our teenage youth. Although video game violence has been blamed for high profile school shootings, video games and its creators should not be held accountableRead MoreReal World Violence And Video Games1513 Words   |  7 PagesReal-World Violence and Video Games From news outlets, to politicians, to parents: when tragedies occur they place the blame on many different sources. After the Sandy Hook shooting, media networks fiercely debated whether or not video games played a part in the shooter’s motives, as he had played games from the notorious Grand Theft Auto series prior to the shooting. Some even suggested banning video games outright, despite the fact that other mediums that can portray violence, such as moviesRead MoreEssay on Yoko Ono: Alternative and Conceptual Art Genius1111 Words   |  5 Pages Yoko Ono is known for being the famous John Lennon’s wife and the scapegoat that is blamed for breaking up the pop/rock sensation group, The Beatles. Unfortunately, She is lesser known and given less media credit for being a fantastic alternative artist. Ono focuses on installation, performance, and conceptual art. Installation art is defined by the artist taking a whole space, room, or building like a museum and transforming it into their art exhibit. The patrons walk in to see an exhibit andRead MoreEssay on Tarantino: Genius or Violence-Obsessed?2362 Words   |  10 Pagesdropped out to pursue a dream of his? Would you change your mind? What if he lied on his rà ©sumà © to ‘compensate for his lack of experience in the film industry’, would you hire him? He gathered all of his knowledge while working at The Manhattan Beach Video Archives. There, he was able to work on some of his earlier scripts such as, True Romance (1993), and Natural Born Killers (1994). Looking to direct his first movie, he was able to get ahold of distribution company, Miramax Films, with Lawrence BenderRead MoreA Critical Review of â€Å"the Ambiguities of Football, Politics, Culture, and Social Transformation in Latin America† by Tamir Bar-on.14147 Words   |  57 PagesA Critical Review of â€Å"The Ambiguities of Football, Politics, Culture, and Social Transformation in Latin America† by Tamir Bar-On. Introduction: In Latin America, soccer is not a game; it is a way of life. It is mixed in with politics and nationalism. It defines social classes. How politically influential is soccer in Latin America? It is used by â€Å"various Latin American socio-economic elites in order to retard the acceleration of working class and popular discontent† (Bar-On 1997:1.8). Is itRead MoreBook Review of William Goldings Lord of the Flies2866 Words   |  11 Pagesreal power to push a dictator out of office, but in the aftermath of the revolution in Libya, for example, the mass of society sees that it still doesnt have much power to positively impact their lives. Nothing much changed. And along comes a vile video that denigrates their religion and so, this theory goes, they seek to demonstrate their illusion of mastery by ransacking the embassy of the nation that symbolizes the power they Libyan people never had and perhaps never will. Like children playingRead MoreViolence Among Youth3553 Words   |  15 Pagesoptimal growth, psychologically vulnerable children particularly need a less socially toxic place to grow. Research indicates that the following social toxins affect aggressive boys more than other children: †¢ violence in the movies, television, and video games; †¢ large high schools have negative effects especially on students whose grades are below Average. †¢ drugs and guns. 4. Children need nurturing and caring adult’s who help them learn to break the â€Å"code of silence† dthat keeps them from reportingRead More How The Twilight Zone Reflected American Society in the 1950s4909 Words   |  20 Pagesthe century. During the fifties, Americans experienced vast changes not only in our countrys position in the world, but also in our own culture -- and one of the leading vehicles for this change was television. In a time when situation comedies and game shows dominated the air waves, Rod Serlings science fiction anthology program stood out as an example not only of the artistic potential of television in terms of writing and special effects, but also of the power television had as social commentaryRead More Discontent Expressed through Blues, Jazz, Reggae, and Hip-hop5489 Words   |  22 Pagesform in the black community and in turn shape the urban black communities of the twentieth century (DeVeaux 412). According to musicologist Mtusmishi St. Julien, the termjazzwas a name originally given by prejudiced whites to the black mans contemporary musical expression. For many black jazz artists, it contains derogatory connotations (Spencer 162). However, for both jazz artists and other African-Americans, the music is viewed as a means of empowerment. There is no limitation to jazz; it isRead MoreNew World Order in Conspiracy Theory13987 Words   |  56 PagesCampaigning for the New World Order  and 1987 book  Say No! to the New World Order, articulated the anti-globalist  theme of much current right-wing conspiracism in the U.S.. Thus, after the  fall of communism  in the early 1990s, the main demonized  scapegoat  of the American  far right  shifted seamlessly fromcrypto-communists  who plotted on behalf of the Red Menace to globalists who plot on behalf of the New World Order. The relatively painless nature of the shift was due to growing right-wing  opposition

Monday, May 18, 2020

Crime Punishment In The 1600s Essay - 1163 Words

Crime Punishments in 1600’s, 1700’s, and 1800’s People have been committing crimes for many centuries, however over time crime punishment changed in different ways. Some of the punishment methods used in one century is found not affective in another century. In England, during the 1600’s crime punishment where hasher and people who were considered criminals did not get many opportunities to be put on trial most time before being sent to face the death penalty. There are many factor that could have contributed to how crime punishment have revolved from the 1600’s all the way to the 1800’s. What were the causes that made the punishments from the 1600’s very different from the ones in the 1700’s and 1800’s? Is it just the different method†¦show more content†¦These two cases are one of many cases in the 16th century Old Bailey records, where a small crime is highly punishable same as a big crime such as murder. Crime punishment in the 17th century in London was not any better than the methods such as the death penalty used in the 16th century. Matter of fact, one could say that the punishments in the 17th century was exactly as it was in the 16th century London. During this time period, people were still being punished for committing small crimes like stealing things. â€Å"There was still support for the execution of the most serious offenders, however, and in certain contexts, such as the 1720s and 1780s, which both experienced crime waves and political instability, the proportion of convicts executed increased.† (London Lives 1690 to 1800 crimes, poverty and social policy in the metropolis). Men and women were punished almost in the same way, however, if a pregnant woman is found guilty of any crime, she was given time to deliver the baby before she faced her punishment for her crimes. In the 17th, most the famous crime punishment method was hanging, criminals who were convicted were hanged instead of given other types of punishment.Show MoreRelatedIs Police Misconduct Been A Problem For Decades?896 Words   |  4 PagesEssay # 3 Police misconduct has been a problem for decades. People have been; falsely imprisoned, beaten, robbed, raped, and killed at the hands of corrupt cops. This has been a problem for a long time to a diverse group of people, however, it has always and continues to be a major problem for black or African American people. African Americans have been brutalized and killed by corrupt cops since the 1600’s, sadly this behavior continues in the year 2016. The United States government should putRead MoreTheories Of The Age Of Enlightenment1026 Words   |  5 PagesOffending acts were punished by a wide range of inhumane acts including but not limited to being tarred and feathered, quartered, burned alive, beheaded, drowned, or stoned to death. This way of thinking and punishing offenders continued through the 1600’s until the Age of Enlightenment. It was during this time that Thomas Hobbes wrote a book proposing theories that would change the way many people think about other in dividuals and their actions. Thomas Hobbes’ most influential contributions to theRead More Do Not Bring Back Flogging Essay1032 Words   |  5 Pagesor strap or rope as a form of punishment† (â€Å"Flogging† 1). Throughout the 1600s, flogging was utilized by â€Å"Boston’s Puritan Forefathers† (Jacoby 1) as a method of corporal punishment for various crimes. Progressing forward, Jeff Jacoby, columnist for The Boston Globe, provides readers with his view of â€Å"Boston’s Forefathers’† system of punishment in his essay, â€Å"Bring Back Flogging.† Within the contents of his work, Jacoby describes how flogging was utilized as punishment in its day. One such exampleRead MoreThe Death Penalty Is Not An Easy Subject1585 Words   |  7 PagesWe have all seen the movies about prisoners being put to death. Whether it had been the public beheadings of the medieval era or the common hangings used in the 1800s, we are familiar wit h the idea of the death penalty. When capital punishment becomes a topic of conversation most individuals do what they can to change the subject and avoid debate. The death penalty over the last century has become a sensitive subject for some. Though most people are either for or against, there are a few that remainRead MoreThe Effects Of Capital Punishment On Society1516 Words   |  7 PagesCapital Punishment Tyra L. Ferguson SYP4514: Patterns of Violence in Society University of Central Florida Introduction Capital punishment was first noted in America in the early 1600’s (â€Å"Part I: History of†, 2014). Much like most of the laws in America, capital punishment was brought here and influenced by European settlers (â€Å"Part I: History of†, 2014). Many crimes that were punishable by death in its infancy in America ranged from stealing fruit to murder. Capital punishment metRead MoreThe Crimes Of The Common Law And State Statutes Made About Murder1366 Words   |  6 Pagesabout how to stop these crimes and how the offender should be punished. Many laws have changed throughout the existence of the common law, but the crimes have yet to stop being committed. For the second core essay, the class was asked to write about one of the crimes against persons. The crimes against persons include: murder, manslaughter, assault, and rape. These crimes occur when one of these actions are forced upon another individual. After reading about all the crimes against persons, it i sRead MoreThe German And The American Police Forces Essay1562 Words   |  7 Pagesthe need for such a force to be created. Potter, a professor in Justice Studies, studies the changes within the United States’ criminal justice system which makes the comparison between these two states much easier. Though the intention of such an essay was to look at present-day similarities and differences between the states, the differences throughout history of the two separate systems became a much more telling and important route to take. Literature Review To understand the similaritiesRead MoreEssay about Drinking Age Controversy1076 Words   |  5 Pagesdrinking age be lowered to the age when legally a person becomes an adult and assumes all other adult responsibilities, or should it remain at a higher age to allow people to grow more mature and, hopefully, make more responsible decisions? In the mid 1600’s, colonial laws attempted to control alcohol consumption, but drinking per se was not remonstrated. Between 1913 and 1919 there was a lot of controversy between the â€Å"wet† states, which were states that allowed liquor, and the â€Å"dry† states, whichRead MoreHistory and Laws of Death Penalty2834 Words   |  11 Pagesto death after being convicted for committing a heinous crime. Death penalty differs from extrajudicial penalty in the sense that for a person to be penalised to death he or she must be convicted by law, whereas extrajudicial penalty is carried out without the permission of the court. Death penalty and capital punishment are often used interchangeably but there is a marked difference between the two. Death penalty becomes capital punishment after a person is killed. Still, many believe that bothRead MoreWitchcraft and Great Powers1817 Words   |  8 Pagesmodern Europe witchcraft was considered a crime due to people of this time period being very superstitious. During this time period Witchcraft lead to the invention of such things as Devils and monsters. The bubonic plague and crimes of Heresy lead to many deaths and therefore the ideology that developed was it was the work of Witchcraft. It will be established during this essay the reasons why the use and practice of Witchcraft was deemed to be a crime. The most favourable belief during early modern

Monday, May 11, 2020

The History of Vampires - 1397 Words

We currently live in a pop culture world that seems obsessed with vampires. From gothic vampire novels, to endless movies, television and art, the vampire archetype continues to grow in popularity and sophistication. What is behind this seeming obsession with vampires, in our western culture? Why does this archeype endure? What does the vampire have, or do, that makes him/her so attractive and compelling? When did the transformation occur, from foul miscreant to suave tragic hero? Who is the vampire - really? Vampire culture seems in stark contrast with the current technological age and advances in science. Starting out in the dim and obscure recesses of Eastern European folk tales and legends, the vampire has reached center stage in†¦show more content†¦Mercy s desecrated remains were then reburied in a plot next to her sister and mother. Mercy s brother Edwin was not cured and died two months later. Thus ends this tragic, but true tale of vampirism in the U.S. Unfortunately, due to the prevailing folklore and superstitions in the 19th century and the pervasive spread of consumption, these bizarre practices often occurred in Europe and the U.S. In 1897, with the publishing of his novel Dracula, Bram Stoker succesfully transforms the image and the conventions of the Vampire from lowly sub-human parasite, to that of an intelligent, but somewhat evil superhero. Count Dracula resides in a castle, has superhuman powers and unlimited material wealth. He is a mysterious and genious intellect, who is (almost) immortal. The new vampire is fantastically seductive and is almost omnipotent in his knowlege and power over humans. However, he is a tragic hero who s eternal damnation and demise can be hastened by sunlight, and wooden stakes through the heart. He is also vulnerable to the beauty and innocence of attractive mortal women, who he must pursue, corrupt and discard. Although impressively handsome and lonely, he can no longer experience the love and true companionship of a mortal woman and is surrounded by shallow creatures he has already corrupted and who once corrupted, can no longer be desired or loved. The new literary vampire is incredibly popular, as the attractive, evilShow MoreRelatedThe History of Vampires1194 Words   |  5 PagesThe vampire is one of the oldest mythological creatures in the world. It has been around for thousands of years and is found in nearly every culture. There are many different kinds, the red-eyed corpses from China, the Greek Lamia- a woman with the lower body of a winged serpent, the Penanggalang in Malaysia- a woman with a detachable head, etc. The most commonly known, however, is the Romanian vampire, it is used often in pop culture, from movies, to television, to literature. The myth of theRead MoreHistory of the Concept and Image of Vampires807 Words   |  4 PagesVampires are known as mythical beings with white pale glittery skin that drain the essence of life known as blood. As unbelievable as it sounds they actually did exist centuries ago. They weren’t anything like the vampires we see in movies, shows, books, and video games toda y. A vampire or something analogous to it can be found in most culture and folklores going back to the beginning of time, but it is a mistake to think they have familiar attributes of Count Dracula. The term â€Å"vampire† appearedRead MoreVampires in Myth and History Essay1372 Words   |  6 PagesVampires in Myth and History Vampire myths go back thousands of years and occur in almost every culture around the world. Their variety is almost endless; from red eyed monsters with green or pink hair in China to the Greek Lamia which has the upper body of a woman and the lower body of a winged serpent; from vampire foxes in Japan to a head with trailing entrails known as the Penanggalang in Malaysia. However, the vampires we are familiar with today, although mutatedRead MoreThe Different Types of Vampires Throughout History1084 Words   |  5 PagesIconic vampires in pop culture include Dracula, Angel, and Edward Cullen, but the lore can be traced back even further than the earliest thought of each of these icons. Doctor Guiley, a paranormal enthusiast, has researched countless tales of vampires, and has been able to divide her research into five different generalized areas. Doctor Murgatroyd, a professor of humanities at McMaster University, has studied references to vampires and other supernatural creatures throughout the literary history ofRead MoreVampires in Modern Culture1113 Words   |  5 Pagesmonsters throughout history are blood sucking immortals known as vampires. They transgress the boundaries that humans are always trying to establish. Vampire lore has reflected the values and social structures of the culture it has existed in, but over the past century the val ues have transformed. From the classic story of Stoker’s Dracula where he is presented as sinister and non-human, the vampire aspect of literature has evolved drastically to a more heroic immortal. Physically, vampires have changedRead MoreVampires : The Myth, Legends, And Lore1466 Words   |  6 Pagesbe unpopular, but in time will become popular again. Vampires have always been one of those things along with zombies. Zombies are something that many people believe that can become real one day, but when it comes to vampires they are just fantasy. People have lost history. In many different cultures’ history, vampires were thought of as possible creatures. There were even humans that believe they had become one. The distorted history of vampires have changed people’s minds because there are certainRead MoreThe Mystery Of The Vampire1583 Words   |  7 PagesThe vampire is the popular character in folklore from early civilization to modern life. The vampire appears in people mind with the passion of immortality, fear, love and mystery. People are attracted with vampire because the superstition of the vampire has done for centuries. Are they real? What are they? Wh ere they come from? There are a few of thousand questions about the beliefs of vampire during many centuries. People don’t stop their curiosity with vampire- the legend that emulates the worldRead MoreVampires : The Myth, Legends, And Lore1730 Words   |  7 Pagesin pop culture. Commonly zombies and vampires are the talk of everyone. To the extent that some people believe that zombies can one day exist and vampires are just a fantasy. But people have lost their history, in many different cultures’ history, vampires were thought of as possible creatures. Vampires have been a thing for centuries, although the term vampire came after. There were even humans that believe they had become one. The distorted history of vampires has changed people’s minds becauseRead MoreComparing The Vs. Vampire Folklore1368 Words   |  6 PagesFinal Essay Different depictions of vampires are commonly exhibited in vampire folklore in past and present literature and film. The diversity of different variations of vampire legends are prominently seen in most literature, but the main ideas and attributes are generally the same. This is not that case when focusing on specific novels discussed in class. The novels I Am Legend by Richard Matheson and Fledgling by Octavia Butler are two contrasting works of vampire folklore. The novels are about differentRead MoreVampires Real?1083 Words   |  5 PagesVampires Are Real With today’s media a fascination with monsters has risen to an all-time high. One monster in particular, though, has become the center point for all attention, the vampire. Many believe the existence of vampires is just a myth. One valid arguments of non-believers is that if vampires did exist, wouldn’t they have depleted their food source? Early legends of vampires are supported by the belief that people suffering from a deadly, but rare, blood disease not vampirism. Believers

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Filmmaking Is An Art, It s Way Of Expressing Something

Through out this student inquiry project i’ve decided to do something based on filmmaking, Filmmaking is an art, it’s way of expressing something. Film editing is partially defined ass creative post production process of filmmaking. In this era, film has made a huge impact on digital technology to be able to use different types of technology to edit. The editors are usually given a bunch of videos usually called ‘raw’ footage their goal is to create a combined timeline of videos creating the story, and putting them in order (Dmytryk, Edward (1984). When it comes to filmmaking it doesn’t matter about expensive cameras. An example of this is Casey Neistat, film director, producer, designer, creator of popular YouTube videos since 2010 and a†¦show more content†¦and London International Film Festivals, Tarnation was initially made for a total budget of $218.32, using free iMovie software on a Mac. Talking about these shows, that you don’t need a lot of money just to produce a good movie but more on whats happening inside and what you’re trying to show and the story. The most important in a film is the story. One of the most important parts is the key scenes and the outline of the film, what the film is about, how it s going to come out and how.Storyboards are very important, as it’s a draft and how it’s going the scene is going to look. You plan the whole things, and consider the frames, angles, editing and how the scenes are going to be put together. A story board was made an example is in the folio and it was helpful to know what scene to shoot next. Creating this film, I had no idea, but somehow came up with the idea of â€Å"What is the secret to happiness† I feel like this film really goes to the young teenagers suffering depression or feel sad in a lot of times. I feel like relating to this really made me come up with a story, where there’s a meaning behind it. Getting the equipment was hard, I had to borrow cameras from my mates and had to use my Samsung S4 phone at a few clips (1:15 - 1:19). It shows how the quality of the phone now days will let you

Leadership Succession Free Essays

Is it necessary for Citigroup to have a leadership succession plan? Why? Leadership succession planning is very important from two perspectives. First of all, it helps to select highly-potential candidates, who have strong leadership abilities and possess all necessary qualities to assume high administrative positions in the future. Besides, leadership succession plan also includes the measures on giving a wide range of learning, training and development opportunities for such individuals in order to improve their professional performance, proficiency, managerial abilities, leadership skills, and so on. We will write a custom essay sample on Leadership Succession or any similar topic only for you Order Now Undoubtedly, if Citigroup does not pay attention on the situation around Sandy Weill right now, the company’s risk to be left without an effective leader will be increasing. Sandy Weill is a man over 70, and at this age his professional abilities as an executive can get worse at any time. That is why, I suppose, there is an urgent vital need for the company to select and start preparing someone who would be able to succeed Mr. Weill. 2. Who should have the responsibility of preparing a succession plan? For large organizations and corporations specialists suggest establishing special Leadership Planning Boards, which would carry out the main activities on leadership succession planning. Such activities have to include identifying critical positions, establishing criteria and identifying the best candidates (at least two for one position), reviewing and monitoring their professional progress and personal development, interviewing and evaluating every candidate and coming up with some conclusions and suggestions. Undoubtedly, such departments as Business Human Resources Units or Corporate Human Resources Departments have to be also involved in leadership succession planning process. They have to assist Leadership Planning Boards and give all necessary information about potential candidates. Top managers from Board of Directors or Chief Officers have to take all the responsibilities on supervising and controlling the effectiveness of leadership succession planning process (Tennessee Valley Authority, 2000). 3. Should the succession plan include insiders? Outsiders? Or both? I think that it is preferable for any company or organization to select the candidates from the insiders. If there are qualified and talented managers, who worked and had opportunity to develop together with the company for some time, they are certainly better aware of the specifics of company’s business, strategies of management, organizational culture and traditions, etc. Moreover, they could already win some reputation and respect of the employees; therefore, they are potentially effective leaders or top managers. But there can be a situation when there are good outside candidates, who had no experience of working with the company. In such case, I suppose, it is necessary not only to interview such candidates and estimate their potential effectiveness, but also involve them into business activities of the company as soon as possible. I strongly believe that working closely with the leaders and learning more and more from them is a key factor for good performance of any successor. 4. Why do executives such as Weill avoid the succession issue? I think that Mr. Weill can have some personal reasons for doing this. Possibly, he does not take leadership succession as a reality or does not want someone to be on his back. Maybe he assumes any succession plan as the necessity of his resignation or as a sign of lack of trust from his colleagues. There’s also probability that he is trying to avoid all succession plan initiatives in order to prove own competence and uniqueness. Nevertheless, I believe that this situation is not a typical one, especially for such huge organizations as Citigroup. Usually, top managers and executives demonstrate concern about their organizations and get actively involved in succession planning. They can point on some possible successors, work with them, train and promote them in order to prepare such candidates for taking higher positions and make them understand, what the organization requires to remain successful. References: Leadership/Succession Planning. (2000) Tennessee Valley Authority. Retrieved June 29, 2007, from: http://www.tva.gov/foia/readroom/policy/prinprac/intstaffplan1.htm. Ritter, J. (2003, April 15) Succession Planning: A Tool for Success. The Galt Global Review. Galt Western Personnel Ltd. Retrieved June 29, 2007, from: http://www.galtglobalreview.com/business/succession.html . How to cite Leadership Succession, Essay examples

Imagination is more important than knowledge Essay Example For Students

Imagination is more important than knowledge Essay Personally I feel that there’s no dichotomy between knowledge and imagination. Imagination is needed to create new concepts (ideas) and knowledge, and new knowledge enables further discoveries, functioning as a springboard to imagination. So, whichever way we look or any situation we take into account, there’s always some basic thread, some or maybe very little knowledge, which is a â€Å"justified† â€Å"belief† and universally accepted so that turns out to be an important reason also to support, which then becomes root to imagine further and discover something new. So I say, you acquire, you imagine, you generate. It’s not true that knowledge is limited to all we now know, because we can create new knowledge. Imagination is only one way of expanding our knowledge, but there are equally other â€Å"ways of knowing† that can help us with this. â€Å"Language† can be one way, as it is rule governed, intended and creative and open-ended. The catchiest thing is that everyone agrees to given rules and so a new knowledge could be easily given born to. As the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis states that, language determines our experience of reality and we can see and think only what our language allows us to see and think. For example, the Inuit are said to have many different words for snow, and their sophisticated snow vocabulary helps them to make them finely grained snow discrimination. As a result, they see and experience snow-covered landscapes quite differently from the rest of us. The same can be dealt through informal reasoning, on the basis of Post hoc ergo propter hoc, it means, ‘after this, therefore on account of this’. Knowledge can be generated on the basis of reasoning also, for example if a person has read in a magazine that stray dogs bite and we become victim of rabies disease. Now when that person saw a dog on street, he deduced that he should be aware of this knowledge, that if this dog bite me, I’ll get suffer with rabies. This is deduction of logic from a bigger group to a particular, hence is knowledge generated from reason. If we look at the example of The Revolutionary War. In the revolutionary war, the british redcoats by far outnumbered the revolutionary soldiers, the generals of the British army knew the number of troops the American had, however they did not know the conditions of America. The British were not aware of the abundant woodland in America, the Americans had a huge advantage over them because they were used to the woodland and they won the battle. If the British had known about the abundant woodland and had gotten used to it, they might have won the battle. So was Einstein right? Is imagination more important than knowledge? As our realities become more complex we seem increasingly to prefer imagination, but that preference is culture-dependent. Imagination blossoms when its products are highly valued. Producers of fantasies also operate within political constraints. Imagination can be highly political, as Orwell, Koestler and Solzhenitsyn demonstrated: too overt an attack on the status quo can bring retribution from the authorities, in totalitarian regimes especially. Industries of knowledge may be controlled for the same reason. So the Knowledge and Imagination ratio keeps on changing, as the time passes. From the above, it would seem that there are several considerations involved in deciding, which is dominant over other. Knowledge or Imagination. Personality, culture and other friendly aspects promote towards the convolution involved in Einstein’s statement. Is imagination more important than knowledge? In an utterly and thoroughly way it depends on whom you talk to, what you talk about, and at what time and space in. ________________ The Interview was published in the Philadelphia Saturday Evening Post, October 26th, 1929. .u994c64753b54e45fcba6159d54ec4b45 , .u994c64753b54e45fcba6159d54ec4b45 .postImageUrl , .u994c64753b54e45fcba6159d54ec4b45 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u994c64753b54e45fcba6159d54ec4b45 , .u994c64753b54e45fcba6159d54ec4b45:hover , .u994c64753b54e45fcba6159d54ec4b45:visited , .u994c64753b54e45fcba6159d54ec4b45:active { border:0!important; } .u994c64753b54e45fcba6159d54ec4b45 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u994c64753b54e45fcba6159d54ec4b45 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u994c64753b54e45fcba6159d54ec4b45:active , .u994c64753b54e45fcba6159d54ec4b45:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u994c64753b54e45fcba6159d54ec4b45 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u994c64753b54e45fcba6159d54ec4b45 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u994c64753b54e45fcba6159d54ec4b45 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u994c64753b54e45fcba6159d54ec4b45 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u994c64753b54e45fcba6159d54ec4b45:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u994c64753b54e45fcba6159d54ec4b45 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u994c64753b54e45fcba6159d54ec4b45 .u994c64753b54e45fcba6159d54ec4b45-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u994c64753b54e45fcba6159d54ec4b45:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Consider the techniques used by Nichols and Taylor Essay Lagemaat, Richard Van De. Theory of knowledge for the IB Diploma. P:48. Cambridge: University Press 2005 Lagemaat, Richard Van De. Theory of knowledge for the IB Diploma. P:68. Cambridge: University Press 2005 http://www. squidoo. com/albert-einstein-quote http://en. wikipedia. org/wiki/Status_quo.

Thursday, April 30, 2020

The Crucible Essay Essays - Salem Witch Trials, The Crucible

The Crucible Essay It is a play with tremendous feelings with many inside twists hidden in the archives of the true story. It is a play with emotional feelings, feelings of anger, hate, evil, manipulation, good, and pureness. It is the The Crucible. In the play, Arthur Miller develops the idea that powerfully held beliefs direct people's behaviour, Abigail Williams who accuses others to escape from punishment, Mary Warren who chooses to lie to keep herself out of trouble, and John Proctor who chooses to sacrifice his life to save the lives of other innocent people. Arthur Miller develops Abigail Williams as an evil character. She tempts Proctor into lechery, and come its illegal acts which all are against the Puritan religion. To escape punishment for dancing, she deflects the actions and blames them on someone else, and does not care how many lives she destroys. Later when she grows into power and influence, she seems to enjoy sending these innocent people their deaths. She also uses evil actions disguised as good by admitting who was with the devil, ?She sends her spirit on me in church; she makes me laugh at prayer!? (P.44) Obviously the people she accuses are actually innocent, but she has the ability to manipulate Judge Danforth into believing that she is doing the right thing and telling the truth. Mary Warren's intentions at the beginning of the story were to do good and justice. But she sees that when she is in trouble, she also needs someone to deflect the punishment on. This greed results in her saying that John Proctor was associated with Satan, and that he possessed her and made her do all of wrong actions, ?You are the Devil's man! I'll not hang with you! I love God, I love God.?(P.118) Her intentions were first good, but then her actions turned into evil, just like Abigail Williams. John Proctor is the protagonist in the play. He is a hero at the end of the play, when he falsely admits that he was with Satan all a long. He then refuses to tell the judge and accuse anyone of being with Satan too like Abigail did. Therefore he may be considered a hero, for dying for a cause of saving the lives of other innocent people. John Proctor also tries to defend his wife, and attempts to make the judge realize how Abigail Williams is manipulating him. In conclusion, Arthur Miller develops the idea that powerfully held beliefs direct people's behaviour. The forces of good always tried to do what was the best for everybody, even if it meant breaking some Puritan laws. The evil group did whatever was best for themselves. They were greedy, and had no consideration of others. Bibliography english and Social Studies Department